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Wendy Levin

Wendy Levin

 


Wendy talks about choosing Peluso mics and their place in her studio:

"A big project in 2016 provided budget for some new microphones, and personal research and listening were absolute requirements before purchase.

After holding a large-diaphragm condenser mic shootout that inluded the studio's then-top-two vocal mics, plus five other microphones loaned by manufacturers, the two Peluso tube mics in the group clearly prevailed. Out of two female singers, two male singers, a female rapper, and a sax player to perform through the linepup of mics, all but one named the Peluso P-49 as their top choice for its warm, rich tone. The lone outlier, a male vocalist who sang a vocal jazz standard, chose the Peluso 22 251 as his favorite for its lyrical airiness, with the P-49 still a close second.

Shootout Lineup

Originally planning on adding just one new high-end vocal mic to the studio's mic closet, I fell in love with the contrasting characters of these two mics. In the past year, the choice to invest in both mics has proven itself many times over. In one notable session, a haunting fingerstyle steel-string acoustic guitar part actually came across as TOO robust through the 49 - but translated with the perfect delicacy upon swapping out for the 251. It would still have been an excellent recording if I'd only had the 49 available, but in this and many other sessions, I can make BETTER recordings for having both of my Peluso mics on hand to compare and select, or even sometimes combine and layer.

Day-to-day, I'd estimate that vocal sessions comprise around half of the studio's recording hours. So my Peluso mics are up in front of singers and rappers more often than for any other single purpose. However, among the other 50% or so of my past year's recording sessions, I've had the Peluso mics at work recording my Baldwin piano, steel string and nylon string acoustic guitars, flute, piccolo, clarinet, soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone saxophones, cajon, bongos, chimes, shakers, tambourines, and other percussion instruments. I also frequently use them as room mics - in conjunction with dynamic mics close-miking the amp on electric guitar sessions, or one mic close, the other as ambient room, for the vocals, acoustic guitars, brass, and woodwinds.

"Your mics are amazing!" sums up a commonly heard exclamation from my clients - and their producers - upon hearing their headphone or control room monitor mixes and their recorded tracks. Of course there's more to what they're hearing than the mic, but the microphone is the very first piece of gear in line to receive the music from the vocalist, instrument, or amplifier, and my Peluso mics are doing a brilliant job of conveying those tones from their sources into my recording signal path."

Wendy Levin & Peluso Mics


Wendy Levin: Audio Engineer, Producer, Musician

Wendy Levin earned her Bachelor's Degree in Commercial Music (guitar performance) at Musician's Institute in Hollywood, and shortly thereafter, began her engineering career as a staff engineer and instructor in the school's renowned Recording Institute of Technology. Surrounded from day one by outstanding engineering and musicianship, she developed exacting standards and the drive to develop her skills to that same level. Her discography from her first two years as a recording engineer includes 2nd-engineer credits on albums for the likes of fusion greats Tribal Tech, Victor Wooten, and Steve Smith, and Dream Theater members Derek Sherinian and James LaBrie, among others. Toward the end of this period, she rose to first-engineer status working on projects with drum legends Dennis Chambers and Virgil Donati.

In 2005, pursuing her growing interest in the art and science of mastering, she landed a coveted internship at Airshow Mastering in Boulder, CO, where she trained with owner/chief engineer David Glasser and his staff of Grammy winners.

Jenn Takahashi

At the close of that same year, Wendy carried her knowledge of traditional studio techniques into a new partnership with music school friend and bandmate D. M. Gremlin, relocating back to California to join up with his recently established D. M. Gremlin Productions in Long Beach. Gremlin founded his studio with the mission of incorporating the most essential elements of the "big studio" world, in order to create a business model that could provide high-level studio services at rates well within the budgets of unsigned and independent musicians. After Gremlin's untimely passing in 2007, Wendy was able to restructure and reopen as D. M. Gremlin Studios in his honor, where she continues the same mission as sole owner/operator and engineer through the present day.

Jayme Claire

In her years at RIT, Wendy's duties included both engineering on sessions for world-class musicians, and guiding student bands through their first recording studio experiences. Her D. M. Gremlin Studios career is much the same; the studio's excellence attracts seasoned bands and professional musicians, while she also continues in mentoring numerous less-experienced artists and music hobbyists through the recording process. Whether working solely on the technical end as an engineer, or building full arrangements and providing performance coaching in her role as engineer/producer, the unceasing goal is to help every client make their best possible studio recording.

The choice to work as an independent studio owner means that Wendy's ongoing discography is no longer filled with big names. Yet some of the biggest names in recording equipment populate her outboard gear racks and mic closet. These range from worldwide-known companies such as API, SSL, and Manley, to boutique makers crafting their own designs - with Peluso Mic Labs included in these ranks. Every piece of recording equipment she chooses, whether an investment of several hundred dollars or several thousand, is carefully selected for its role in creating top-notch recordings within a small, yet impressive, collection - always toward the purpose of keeping uncompromising recording quality eminently affordable to the studio's clients and clients-to-be.

D. M. GremlinStudios Control Room


 

Quote

"After holding a large-diaphragm condenser mic shootout that inluded the studio's then-top-two vocal mics, plus five other microphones loaned by manufacturers, the two Peluso tube mics in the group clearly prevailed. Out of two female singers, two male singers, a female rapper, and a sax player to perform through the linepup of mics, all but one named the Peluso P-49 as their top choice for its warm, rich tone. The lone outlier, a male vocalist who sang a vocal jazz standard, chose the Peluso 22 251 as his favorite for its lyrical airiness, with the P-49 still a close second.

'Your mics are amazing!' sums up a commonly heard exclamation from my clients - and their producers - upon hearing their headphone or control room monitor mixes and their recorded tracks."

- Wendy Levin



 


Peluso MicrophopnesPeluso 22 251 Peluso P-49

 

 

 




Corinne Crimson
Corinne Crimson: Vocals on the 22 251

 

 

AJ Dvorak
AJ Dvorak: Guitar on the
22 251 and P-49

 

 

Rosevelt Franklin
Roosevelt Franklin: Vocals on the P-49

 

 

Paul J Muschinski
Paul J Muschinski (Herd of Us): Vocals on the P-49

 

 

Bill HIggins
Bill Higgins: Guitar on the
P-49 and 22 251

 

 

Wendy Levin
Engineer Wendy Levin

 

 



Links



D.M. Gremlin Studio Website

 

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D.M. Gremlin Studio FaceBook page

 

 

 
   
 
 
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